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Using pcl-cvs

Once installed, pcl-cvs is very easy to use. You just run the function cvs-update, and pcl-cvs brings up a buffer showing what files in your working copy have been modified or updated. From there, you can commit, do diffs, and so on.

Because cvs-update is the main entry point, I suggest that you bind it to a convenient key sequence before going any further. I have it bound to Ctrl+c v in my .emacs:

     (global-set-key "\C-cv" 'cvs-update)

Otherwise, you can run it by typing M-x cvs-update (also known as Esc-x cvs-update).

When invoked, cvs-update runs cvs update as if in the directory of the file in the current buffer – just as if you typed cvs update on the command line in that directory. Here's an example of what you might see inside Emacs:

     PCL-CVS release 1.05 from CVS release $Name:  $.
     Copyright (C) 1992, 1993 Per Cederqvist
     Pcl-cvs comes with absolutely no warranty; for details consult the manual.
     This is free software, and you are welcome to redistribute it under certain
     conditions; again, consult the TeXinfo manual for details.
      Modified ci README.txt
      Modified ci fish.c
     ---------- End ----

Two files have been locally modified (some versions of pcl-cvs show the subdirectories where the files are located). The next logical action is to commit one or both of the files, which is what the ci on each line means. To commit one of them, go to its line and type c. You are brought to a log message buffer, where you can type a log message as long as you want (real log message editing is the major advantage of pcl-cvs over the command line). Type Ctrl+c Ctrl+c when done to complete the commit.

If you want to commit multiple files at once, sharing a log message, first use m to mark the files that you intend to commit. An asterisk appears next to each file as you mark it:

     PCL-CVS release 1.05 from CVS release $Name:  $.
     Copyright (C) 1992, 1993 Per Cederqvist
     Pcl-cvs comes with absolutely no warranty; for details consult the manual.
     This is free software, and you are welcome to redistribute it under certain
     conditions; again, consult the TeXinfo manual for details.
     * Modified ci README.txt
     * Modified ci fish.c
     ---------- End ----

Now when you type c anywhere, it applies to all (and only) the marked files. Write the log message and commit them with Ctrl+c Ctrl+c as before.

You can also type d to run cvs diff on a file (or on marked files) and f to bring a file into Emacs for editing. Other commands are available; type Ctrl+h m in the update buffer to see what else you can do.

Karl Fogel wrote this book. Buy a printed copy via his homepage at red-bean.com

copyright  ©  May 24 2019 sean dreilinger url: https://durak.org/sean/pubs/software/cvsbook/Using-pcl_002dcvs.html