next up previous contents
Next: New Perspectives On GUI Up: Document and Standardize Visual Previous: Document and Standardize Visual   Contents

Standardized Icons

Many computer operating systems perform similar functions on similar objects--a user of command-line Vax, UNIX, DOS; or graphical X-Windows, Open-VMS, MS-Windows, and Macintosh will still `copy' files, `delete' files, create `directories' or `folders,' and connect to other machines on a network using invisible protocols. Why not settle on some well-designed, standardized icons to represent these objects and actions in all graphical environments?
A major force that opposes any effort to standardize many computer icons is the desire of many developers to be unique. Every designer wants his application to stand out, and quite frankly, it is more fun to design a special set of icons without trying to imitate others. Often a company wants to reflect its corporate logo in its icons. There has also been an effort by some creative designers to copyright striking and innovative glyphs. It is the user who suffers most from the lack of conformity on individual computers and between computer systems.[20]
Standardization works in airports, train stations, and on traffic signs all over the United States and Europe. Maybe designers don't understand the benefit that such standardization could have for users- especially those who must work with more than one application or operating system. If the manufacturers won't agree, perhaps the artists can.


next up previous contents
Next: New Perspectives On GUI Up: Document and Standardize Visual Previous: Document and Standardize Visual   Contents

sean dreilinger

copyright  ©  September 16 2019 sean dreilinger url: https://durak.org/sean/pubs/art-and-ui/node11.php